Connecting the dots – Crossroads part 1 – Minor chords

Part 1 – minor chords

This part builds upon chapter 2 by adding ‘the non-major chords’ a.k.a. the ‘minor’ chords. It will show the diatonic minor chords of the major scale, in the open voicing on string-set 1. At the end of this part I have added a summary sheet with all major and minor chords per pattern.

The 2 chord

The 2 chord is the first minor* chord in the major scale. It is build with the following scale tones:

2 4 6 (1)

The 1 is left out on purpose. It is the ‘seventh’ of the chord. Seventh chords are dealt with later on in this book.

  • The explanation of the differences between major and minor chords is not something that I will discuss here. There are tons of places on the internet that cover this topic in depth. I assume that anyone who might be interested in this chapter, will be familiar with the concept of major and minor already.

2- chord

The 3 chord

The 3 chord is the second minor chord in the major scale. It is build with the following scale tones:

3 5 7 (2)

The 2 is left out on purpose. It is the ‘seventh’ of the chord. Seventh chords are dealt with later on in this book.

3- chord

The 6 chord

The 6 chord is the third minor chord in the major scale. It is build with the following scale tones:

6 1 3 (5)

The 5 is left out on purpose. It is the ‘seventh’ of the chord. Seventh chords are dealt with later on in this book.

6- chord

The 7 chord

The 7 chord is the last minor chord in the major scale. It is build with the following scale tones:

7 2 4 (6)

The 6 is left out on purpose. It is the ‘seventh’ of the chord. Seventh chords are dealt with later on in this book. The 7 chord is special because besides a lowered ‘third’ and ‘seventh’, it also has a lowered ‘fifth’. This is often referred to as the ‘flat 5’ or ‘b5’.

7-b5 chord

Summary of all 7 diatonic chords

As promised at the beginning of this part, here is a sheet on which I have worked out all of the chords in relation to each other and to the major scale pattern in which they appear. This is my actual practice sheet that I have used a lot already. It is a complete harmonization of the major scale all over the fret-board. When I use these voicings, all chords connect beautifully and sometimes it automatically creates the sound of some nice baroque music.

summary of diatonic triads

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